A Long Deep Furrow

Just a bit of farming being done here in our neck of the woods as we await spring and the melting of snow. Yes, we have begun sowing seeds and working out in the greenhouse, but it will be a while before the first patch of earth is turned over or we see real evidence of spring ephemerals pushing up through the ground. In the meantime, I am re-reading a favorite book of mine, A Long Deep Furrow, Three Centuries Of Farming In New England by Howard S Russell. It is an extraordinary and well-documented account of New England’s farming history, best described by Mark Lapping who wrote this in the forward:
A Long Deep Furrow will be of interest to readers and students of New England history and life, agriculture, environmental studies, and rural affairs and developments. I know of few books which so successfully integrate the elements of biogeography with socioeconomic and cultural patterns within the context of agriculture as a way of life and livelihood. Most of all, the book is a testament to the Yankees who farm the sides of mountains, take gambles on weather and markets like a pack of riverboat cardsharps, and who consistently fly in the face of the “conventional wisdom” which says there is no New England agriculture”.
Aside from this book being a fascinating look into the very beginnings of agriculture and farming in New England, it is especially endearing to me because the diary of my own ancestor, Thomas Minor, was used as a reference.
If you are looking for something to sink your gardening/farming minds into while we await spring and a new season of growth, consider A Long Deep Furrow , I think you’ll like it!

11 comments on “A Long Deep Furrow

        • Hello Laurie, Read your post on Franco-Americans, I have a book called, Immigrants From The North; Franco-Americans Recall the Settlement of Their Canadian Families In The Mill Towns Of New England. Would you like it? I’ll send it if it is something of interest to you. I have no Franco-American ancestry, so happy to pass it along. Like your blog, fellow Mainer!

        • Thanks so much! How very nice. I’ll email you my mailing address. So happy to have come across your blog—and nursery—via Melissa. We live within an easy of Fernwood and plan to come visit sometime in May.

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