Tree Climbing

We recently had to hire an arborist to take a couple of old trees down. Normally, we cut and harvest our own trees but these two trees were in a precarious situation. Both the trees were in among the display beds, and, in addition, had the potential of hitting the power line. Underneath the trees were a variety of shrubs and perennials that were easy targets for falling limbs…azaleas, Japanese maples, a few viburnums, a dogwood. We really didn’t want to do any damage while trying to fell these trees, so, we called Treewise Arboriculture from Appleton, Maine. Jacob DiGirolamo is the very talented and skilled arborist behind Treewise, and let me just tell you, he’s a man skilled in his craft. In a short amount of time, Jacob had the trees down, bit by bit, never once laying a single branch on one of our beloved woody shrubs. Of course, he also missed (with great precision) the house, the arbor, the phone and electrical wires, and a few choice garden sculptures. Just imagine a pinball machine that requires the operator to send their pinball up the course without hitting a single obstacle and with the intention of scoring as high as possible. I’d say he scored pretty damn near 100! Jacob came and stood to look up and access the task at hand, then strapped on his climbing spikes and got to work. It was fascinating to watch him make his cuts and then to use his ropes and knots to lower branches and pieces of the trunk to the ground. Amazing. We can’t say enough about Treewise and Jacob’s efficiency and attention to his craft.His business also includes pruning, removal, and planting. If you have trees that need to come down and you are looking for a congenial young man who is well skilled and devoted to his work, call Jacob. You can find out more by emailing Treewise at or visit this site at Maine Preservation.

Still Winter

With the last storm, we have been taking advantage of the deep snow and of the days when the sun shines with a brilliance. It has been a great time for strapping on the snowshoes and exploring the woods. Two days ago, we tramped up over the ridge across from the farm. It was late in the day and the deer were just descending from the high ground. We counted 10 in a relatively short time. There were tracks everywhere! We came across many places where the ground had been pawed, signs that the deer are digging their way through the deep snow in search of acorns. A Barred owl swooped through just in front of us and landed on the branches of a giant oak tree. Now is the time we hear them calling back and forth to each other with their classic ” who cooks for you, who cooks for you” call. Listen here if you’ve never heard the call of the Barred Owl. They do have other calls as well but this is their typical mating call. Very distinct and one we hear often in the woods of Maine. We are hoping that we get a chance this weekend to head into the woods or trek across the lower fields at the farm. I suppose it’s what we need to do when any thoughts of spring have been put on halt. Spring will come, I believe it will, really I do. But for now, it’s still winter.
Let’s end with a poem about winter and snowshoeing by Sidney Beck…


This valley’s empty blueness
Is filling now with clear sunlight.
Snow clumps tumble from branches
Into man-deep drifts soft bright –
Warmth-rounded, but still chilled.

Big snowshoe-footprints harden
Into pools of blue shadow –
Setting off from a house and garden,
Half-hidden, marked only by the low
Recent prints half-filled.
by Sidney Beck

March Storm

Despite the latest snowstorm, we are setting up for our spring seed starting. The greenhouse will see some action in the next week or so. It’s always a delight to be working in the greenhouse as the weather goes from one season to the next. That big plastic heated space of green growth and soil smells…pure delight! Inside the house, a small area is created for starting the earliest of vegetable seedlings: tomatoes, leeks, peppers, onions, and assortments of annual and perennial flowers. This little growing area inside means rearranging some furniture, moving the couch away from the big windows that face due south, and installing a temporary growing bench. Seeds will be sown, they’ll germinate, get some growth on them, and then be transferred to the big greenhouse. Starting seeds indoors keeps us from firing up the big heater in the greenhouse this early in the year. But, by the end of March, we’ll run out of space in the front room and will need the expanse of the greenhouse benches. At that point, our house will go back to a comfortable living space! We do love having that earthy soil smell wafting through the rooms though!
Outside, it is far too soon to uncover the nursery beds. The snow will have to melt and the ground will have to thaw before we are ready for the task of uncovering. We are always excited about the upcoming season and to unveil all the plants we have propagated and over-wintered. Fun, fun!
So, right now we’re a bit between seasons. A little mud season, a little more winter. A warm spring-like day, then a real chill in the air. A chance to let the fires die down, then a roaring blaze to warm cold hands and cold feet. Back and forth we go here in the northeast, yes? Where do you hail from? Has spring really arrived in your neck of the woods or are you still waiting?