Pesto

Our WWOOF volunteer Lauren helping to plant the last of the winter squash

Our latest WWOOF volunteer( What’s WWOOF? Check it out here) enjoys foraging for wild edibles.This week while weeding the iris bed, she brought in the harvested (weeded) dandelion greens and made a yummy pesto. Along with our nightly side of cultivated greens from the garden, we mixed the dandelion pesto into some fresh spinach tortellini. Delish! Dandelion greens are loaded with vitamins (vitamin C, A, B1, B2, B6 and abundant in vitamin k) and minerals ( calcium, iron, magnesium, and potassium). They are a great antioxidant and help to stimulate good kidney and liver function.
Here’s how Lauren ( our WWOOF volunteer) made her pesto:

2 cups of fresh and cleaned dandelion greens
2 1/2 cups of fresh spinach
3-4 cloves of garlic
juice from 1 lemon ( I’d use some grated lemon rind as well!)
1- 1/2 cups of toasted almond slivers
1/2 cup of olive oil
2 Tbls. nutritional yeast

This was all put into the food processor and blended together. It made two 1 pint jars of pesto, which is already gone! We’ve also been smearing dandelion pesto on our mid-day grilled cheese….sharp cheddar, home-made sourdough, our own bread and butter pickles, and sliced avocado. These we put under the broiler until the cheese is bubbling and gooey. I can only say, I sure hope those dandelion weeds that Lauren eradicated bounce back quickly…we’re out of pesto!!
Try some and let us know what you think.

Build A Planter!!

Build A Hypertufa Planter
Sunday,July 9th, 2017 , 1:00-3:00 Cost: $45.00, materials included

Join us here at Fernwood Nursery for a class on designing and constructing your own hypertufa vessel. Hypertufa is a lightweight medium often used in molding pots, troughs, and planters. Learn the basic ingredients for a hypertufa mix and about the various forms that can be used to create unique and natural looking outdoor planters.
Come build your own, then take it home for planting!
Tea and freshly baked scones will be served.
Class limit 10 and preregistration required. Please call us at (207) 589-4726 or email us at fernwoodnursery@fairpoint.net. You may also contact us here.

Virginia

My posting activity has been on the slack side of things, apologies everyone! I’ve just returned from a graduation and a quick visit to Virginia. It is a very difficult time to leave home but this was an event I couldn’t miss, so off I went. Rick held down the fort here at the nursery, keeping the world of Fernwood running smoothly.
I have never been to Virginia, who claims the flowering dogwood as its state flower and tree, but I was very impressed with these things that make Virginia a special place…
Virginia is beautiful! The flowering magnolias (Magnolia grandiflora), the dogwoods ( Cornus kousa and Cornus florida) and the sweet smelling gardenia were all in bloom and lovely. It is a very tidy state and well mapped out (this being very helpful considering how easily I can navigate myself out of the wilderness but am terrible with finding my way through congested cities). I hardly saw any trash scattered on the roadsides! Virginians should be very proud of this, it makes all the difference when the roadsides and streets are kept tidy! The people of Virginia are very friendly, smiling and saying howdy, never passing you on the street without a smile and a hello. I loved this. The beauty of Virginia was felt everywhere…in its towns, along the beaches, and throughout the rural areas. In addition to having a wonderful time with our son, Noah and his fiancee, I traveled with a dear friend ( a Virginian!) who offered up the very essence of her state….kindness, generosity and a welcoming that beat all. Thank you, thank you, Kari!
I’m home now and back in full swing. We’ll be posting any summer classes this week. We’ll be weeding and planting and harvesting. We’ll be greeting a new WWOOF volunteer. We’ll be continuing to stock the nursery with mid-summer delights. Come on by and say hello, the gardens are bursting and there will be lots to share!
Happy Day everyone!

Some fine words to be thinking and perhaps to live by….

Linnaea borealis here at Fernwood

“To live content with small means. To seek elegance rather than luxury, and refinement rather than fashion. To be worthy not respectable, and wealthy not rich. To listen to stars and birds and babes and sages with an open heart. To study hard, think quietly, act frankly, talk gently, await occasions. Never hurry. In a word, to let the spiritual, the unbidden and the unconscious rise up through the common. This is my symphony.”
—William Henry Channing

Cool But Growing

Our weather here in Maine continues to be on the cool side. I’m almost afraid to tell you that on a few occasions recently we’ve even made a little fire in the wood cookstove to stave off the chill. I’ve done this wearing, mind you, a wool sweater and wool socks. Oh, my.
The gardens are growing and caring on without a hitch. The nursery rows are continuing to be stocked with new plants. We’ve just set out a large block of Cornus canadense…..beautiful full pots! We’ll say goodbye to May, hello to June, and hope for a little sunshine.
Here are few shots from the gardens…

Cypripedium pubescens

Podyphyllum hexandrum, Peony ‘Little Gem’, Peony japonica

Mertensia virginica ‘alba’

Convallaria ” Fernwood’s Golden Slippers”
Our own introduction

Tatsoi

One of our favorite early greens to grow is tatsoi. We sow seeds in the greenhouse in March and when the seedlings are ready, the first batch is planted in the hoop house. Another flat of seed is sown for an outdoor planting late in the spring. Tatsoi is classified as a Brassica and is a variety of Chinese cabbage and commonly known as spoon mustard or spinach mustard. It is a small low-growing plant that forms a rosette of petite, dark green, spoon-shaped leaves. It is super cold hardy, withstanding a temperature as low as 15 degrees F. We can count on having a bounty of tatsoi by mid-April and it does just the trick for satisfying our craving of fresh greens. Tatsoi has a mild taste, much like spinach. Being a plant that likes cooler temperatures ( perfect for here in Maine, yes?), it will become a bit more bitter tasting if allowed to bolt and flower.
We’ll often eat it raw in a salad or on sandwiches, but mostly we use it in a stir-fry or in an omelet. My favorite way to use Tatsoi is quite simple : Saute a medium size onion in a little olive oil, add a lot of minced garlic ( 4-5 cloves), chop the tatsoi (stems include) and toss that in ( we sometimes add shitake mushrooms), sprinkle in a few red pepper flakes, season with tamari and black pepper. We pile this onto some cooked brown rice and top it off with some crumbled feta cheese. Food for the soul! Often during our busy season here at the nursery, this is just what we’ll eat for lunch.Tatsoi is a good source of vitamins A, C, and K, carotenoids, folate, calcium and potassium. So good, so nourishing, I highly recommend adding it to your garden repertoire.

What we’re hobnobbing with….

Green growth, the feel of the earth, tree buds, grass, roots and shoots, life bursting and making its presence known, a recent bloom, the divine smell of lilacs, a fleeting ephemeral, the robust intention of the all- mighty and long-lived rhubarb plant, the tender seedlings trying with all their might.
Ahh, the joy, the privilege, the prayer of it all….
I think, truly, Frank Llyod Wright said it best…
Please, pay attention, witness it, get down on your knees and look.
Life, it’s happening….right before your eyes!

On Mother’s Day

We had lots of visitors at the nursery on Mother’s Day and although it was rainy and cold, the spirit of the day, the celebration of honoring a mom, was fully present. There were smiles between the raindrops (or downpours as it was!) and despite layers of clothing and raingear visitors were willing to brave the elements and find something for their gardens.
Being a mom of two grown children, I am a blessed recipient of their Mother’s Day efforts. One is far away, so a midday call with lots of sappy ‘love you, love you, love you’ chat was offered up to melt my heart. The older of the two showed up early with gifts…an antique wine box because she knows of my infatuation with old wooden boxes and then a little set of enamel cups and saucers because she also knows I like to have a collection of metalware when we head out for an adventure or picnic. That girl! And of course, there was dinner…. grilled burgers with wild mushrooms and a caramelized onion cheddar, a pesto pasta salad, grilled corn, home-made french bread and fresh bruschetta, and a sweet selection of fancy cupcakes. So glad I spent the time in the kitchen with her as a child, it’s really paying off for me now!!
We do hope everyone had a lovely weekend and that the rain didn’t dampen the hopes and intentions of getting into the garden. 80 degrees here in Maine on Thursday I hear, the extremes of spring in the northeast! Happy day everyone!

Ladyslippers

Cypripedium pubescens

We’ve just put the Cypripediums( Ladyslippers) into the aisles here at Fernwood…. pinks, whites, and yellows! For those special ladies on Mother’s Day who love you and their gardens? How about a ladyslipper?

Cypripedium ‘Michael’

Primula

We have had springs like this before, cool and wet. The upside of this kind of weather is that the water table is being replenished and this is a blessing. Water is a blessing, yes? Another advantage to the cooler temperatures is that the blooms on the early woodland plants last longer. The chilly days are slowing the growth of many plants and this allows us to enjoy them a bit longer. We’ve had springs that rush towards summer and cause those same plants to come and go much quicker. We never want to rush things!
Visitors to the nursery wander the gardens discovering and enjoying each little delight….a newly opened trillium, a dainty anemonella, or maybe a sweet crinkled leaf primrose. I think the gardens are like an art gallery at the moment. You stroll through, stopping at each exhibit, and ponder.
Here are a few delights on exhibit at the moment….

Trillium cuneatum

Hellebore orientalis and Cardamine glandulosa

Trillium recurvatum