Pickled Fiddleheads

Our daughter, Zoe, is getting married in September. We’ve been working hard on the preparations and details (aside from all the preparations and details here at the nursery, oh my!). Every day, crossing off one more ‘thing to buy’ or ‘person to call’…there’s lighting, and food, and dance music. Luckily, we have a generous bunch of friends, community, and of course, a family, who are willing to help out. A true blessing, for sure. Today’s project? Pickling fiddleheads for the charcuterie board. Of course, there must be pickled fiddleheads to offer guests if you’re from Maine, right? For this bride, there will be fiddleheads…and lobster rolls, and something made with blueberries. I’ll include a pickled fiddlehead recipe if you’d like to have a go at making some yourself or if, by chance, you have a soon to be bride requesting them at her wedding!
Happy day, everyone!

In a Pickle: Pickled Fiddlehead Ferns

YIELD:
makes 1 pint
ACTIVE TIME:
45 minutes
TOTAL TIME:
1 week
Ingredients
1/2 pound fiddlehead ferns
Kosher salt
1/2 cup apple cider vinegar
1/2 teaspoon mustard seeds
1/2 teaspoon dill seeds
1/4 teaspoon black peppercorns
2 allspice berries
1 garlic clove, smashed
Directions
1.
Place fiddlehead ferns in a large bowl of cold water and wash well. Rub away any brown chaff and trim cut ends.

2.
Add two tablespoons of salt to two quarts of water in a medium saucepan and bring to a boil over high heat. Add fiddlehead ferns and cook for 10 minutes. Drain and rinse with cold water.

3.
Combine vinegar, 1/2 cup water, and 1 teaspoon salt in a small saucepan and bring to a boil. Place spices and garlic cloves into the bottom of a prepared pint jar. Pack fiddlehead ferns into the jar and add hot pickling liquid to cover.

4.
Wipe rim, apply lid and ring and process in a small boiling water bath canner for 10 minutes. Remove jar from canner and let cool on a folded kitchen towel. When jar is cool enough to handle, remove ring and check seal.

5.
Sealed jars can be stored in the pantry for up to one year. Unsealed jars should be refrigerated and used promptly. Let these pickles age for at least a week before eating.

Classes Coming Up!

These two classes are coming up soon. Let us know if you like to attend by emailing us at fernwoodnursery@fairpoint.net calling (207)589-4726. Also, the ladyslippers are potted up and ready to find new homes! Happy gardening, everyone!

Come Learn Some Dirty Words At Fernwood Nursery
Join us at Fernwood Nursery on Sunday, May 20th, 2018 from 2:00 to 4:00 to talk about what’s in your dirt! Green sand, blood meal, and mycorrhiza are just a few of the ”dirty” words you’ll hear when we talk about soil here at Fernwood! We’ll discuss soil structure, the essential components for soil health and plant growth, and how to amend your own garden plots using organic materials that are easily sourced. Find out which animal manures do what, learn about the important minerals in your soil, and discover the benefits of green manures,. Interested in making your own potting soil? We’ll talk about this as well and…. you’ll go home with a sample bag of our own homemade potting mix (along with the recipe)!
In addition to a lively discussion about dirt, freshly baked scones and tea will be served.
Here at Fernwood, we are famous for saying “ if you want to grow good plants, grow good soil” so come join us for an informative afternoon of soil talk!
Class size is limited to 10. Please call ahead (207)589-4726 or email us to sign up at fernwoodnursery@fairpoint.net Class cost is $30.00 Pre-payment is required.

Cypripedium pubescens

Cypripediums: The Life Of Ladyslippers, Unlock The Mystery
Sunday, June 10th, 2018 from 2:00 to 4:00 $30:00 Pre-registration required, space limited

Spend an afternoon here at Fernwood learning about the growing, propagating, and care of those coveted and elusive ladyslippers. Unlock a bit of their mystery, enjoy tea and scones in the studio, and view the many ladyslippers that grace the gardens here at Fernwood. Potted Cypripediums available for sale as well! Email fernwoodnursery@fairpoint.net or call (207)589-4726

Morning Fog On Mother’s Day

Not just the two darling children I am a mother to, but the delightful flock of sheep I tend. This morning it was coffee and fog and a walk down to the lower pasture. I look a little foggy myself! Must be those early mornings and long days catching up with me!
What a beautiful morning and a great start to the day. And now, I must go and eat some scrambled eggs and home-cured bacon with my family. Happy, Happy Mother’s Day!!

Hypertufa Class this Coming Weekend!

Feel like joining us? Here’s the information, still a few spots left! Check out our classes and more page for an updated list of classes for the season. We’ll be adding more as the season progresses, so check back often, you may find a class that is just what you’re looking for!

Mother’s Day Build A Hypertufa Planter
Sunday,May 13th, 2018 , 1:00-3:00 Cost: $45.00, materials included

Mothers, daughters, and sons join us here at Fernwood Nursery for a class on designing and constructing your own hypertufa vessel. Hypertufa is a lightweight medium often used in molding pots, troughs, and planters. Learn the basic ingredients for a hypertufa mix and about the various forms that can be used to create unique and natural looking outdoor planters.
Come build your own, then take it home for planting!
Tea and freshly baked scones will be served.
Class limit 12 and preregistration required. Please call us at (207) 589-4726 or email us at fernwoodnursery@fairpoint.net. You may also contact us here.

Opening Thursday, May 3rd!

Welcome! We’ll be open for the season on Thursday, May 3rd. Every day we are busy stocking the nursery aisles and potting plants, so much to do!
In addition, the sheep have been sheared and the vegetable gardens are underway.

Erythronium dens-canis

Spring is a fury of activity, for sure! The display gardens are bursting with early woodland plants and natives, pure delight! Happy gardening season to all and we’ll see you soon!

Sanguinaria canadense ‘Snow Cone’

On Our Way To Another New Season

Cypripedium pubescens

“The energy of the Earth flows through the veins of Springtime.”
— Terri Guillemets

This weekend we’ll be deep into greenhouse work potting up some great Asian and native Arisaemas, an array of Hepaticas, and several new varieties of Primula. Hard to believe we are only a month away from opening for the season! In addition to many rarities from around the globe, our selection of native and woodland plants is large and varied. The first of the early ephemerals are soon to appear. The snow is melting!! We’ll be offering our Spring Ephemerals and Early Risers class again this year on Sunday, April 29th from 10:00-12:00. For more information and to sign up, please look here.
It is always exciting to start uncovering last year’s propagation work to see what’s come through the long winter slumber. We are already getting mail from customers with questions and thoughts about their own gardening endeavors. Folks are signing up for classes and making plans to visit. The thrill of a new growing season is in the air! No stopping it now!
For us, it’s time to hit the ground running (and avoid sinking too deep into the mud!). Time to head into the cozy earth-smelling greenhouse with a cup of hot tea and some classical music to fill pots and sow seeds for the upcoming season. Ooh, La La! We’re looking forward to seeing everyone next month, can’t wait to talk plants and share ideas. Any specific plants on your ‘have to have it’ list? Any new garden beds being developed?

Join Us For a Brew And A Film At Threshers!

On Saturday, April 7th at 7:00p.m. we will be gathering over at Thresher’s Brewery in Searsmont, Maine for the showing of SEED, The Untold Story. First, let me tell you a little about Threshers Brewery. Threshers, owned and operated by Ethan Evangelos and Scott Bendson, opened its doors in 2016 at the old Sprowl building in Searsmont, Maine.You can read about Ethan and Scott’s story here! For us, it has been a welcomed addition to the community. Here’s why… It’s close by. They have a variety of excellent well-crafted beer (really, these boys know what they’re doing!). The atmosphere is welcoming, easy-going, and friendly. And, they are very community minded. We have been to several benefits and events at Threshers that have helped worthy organizations. In two short years, they have opened their doors many, many times to host events that directly help the community at large. Bravo to Ethan and Scott and their families for being so involved! We appreciate it. We need venues that encourage gathering, socializing with neighbors and friends, and who offer their space for community functions.

We never know who we’ll meet at Threshers, it could be an old time friend in the local community or a traveler who’s heard about their great beer and great events and mosied up to check it out. Always interesting and great conversation, that’s for sure!
We had been talking with Ethan over the last year about showing the film, SEED The Untold Story at the brewery. It’s a film anyone who grows food…anyone who EATS food should watch. When it was first produced ( two years ago?), we here at Fernwood made concerted efforts to promote it and it’s message. We had been contacted by their staff, given a synopsis of the film, and were asked to do our best to get the word out. SEED is an amazing film, beautiful cinematography and it will surely open your eyes to what’s happening with our seed diversity and its impact on our food supply.. It is truly one of our favorite films and we cannot say enough about the effort that has been put into the making of it. Please join us at Thresher’s Brewery (you won’t be disappointed!) and enjoy a free film. By the way, I recommend trying the ‘Ponderosa’ beer (my favorite) at Threshers! See you there! For more information please visit the Threshers Brewery facebook page here.

Strapping On The Snowshoes

Trying to experience and enjoy as much winter as possible here in Maine. My brother and I made a trip over to his land in Rangley (the western part of the state) to do some hiking. It was a beautiful day, fairly warm and the sun was out. My brother, Dan, has always been an outdoor enthusiast. He puts great effort into hitting the trails here in the northeast. I’m always amazed at how much ground he covers. We don’t get enough time together, so it was lovely to spend a day catching up on the ride over and then doing something together that we both love…being in the woods! Plus, he bought me lunch!
Since then we’ve had another snow storm, about 1ft here in our area of Waldo County. A little more time for snowshoeing or strapping on the x-country skis before spring develops.
We are working on a number of classes for this season. Some are posted already, others are in the making. Are there any classes you’d like to see us offer here at Fernwood? Certain topics? We’re glad to hear suggestions. Offering classes at the nursery has been a really fun and rewarding addition for both Rick and I. Not only can we share some insight into our gardening or lifestyle choices here at the nursery, but it also gives us an opportunity to get to know our visitors. Consider taking a class here at Fernwood, come enjoy a selection of homemade scones and tea, and mingle with some fellow gardeners!

Fiber Of Maine And The Heavenly Socks Yarn Shop

My friend Helen Sahadi owns a beautiful yarn shop in Belfast, Maine called Heavenly Socks Yarn. Helen is a lifelong knitter and is passionate about fiber but also about community. Her shop is chock full of the most delicious yarn. Not just eye candy, but lovely squishy yarn that you can take home and make something wonderful out of! It’s the middle of winter, the best time to grab your needles, find a pattern (loads and loads of great patterns at Heavenly Socks Yarn store!!) and start knitting! Take a field trip to Belfast, Maine and visit Helen’s shop…it’s the best!
Helen’s latest addition to her shop is an on-line store where she features Maine yarn from Maine farms. And, guess who’s being featured this month ( February, actually)…us here at Fernwood. You can check us out and Helens great shop and work here: https://www.fiberofmaine.com/

Coffee Time Gems

Preheat oven to 375 degrees
2 cups flour
1/2 cup brown sugar
2 tsp. baking powder
1/2 tsp. baking soda
1/2 tsp. salt.
Mix these dry ingredients and whisk together.
In a separate bowl add,
1 beaten egg
1 cup sour cream
1/2 cup milk
4 TBLS. melted butter
2 tsp. powdered espresso or powdered coffee
Combine these ingredients and whisk to dissolve coffee.
Add all at once to dry ingredients. Don’t over-beat.
Add:
1 cup raisins
1/2 cup finely chopped walnuts

Fill greased muffin tins 2/3 full. Bake for 20-25 minutes.
Enjoy!!!

Growing up, my Grandma, whom I adored, was always on a quest for the perfect bran muffin, the perfect coffee cake, and the perfect banana bread. She was a fine baker. A really wonderful cook. And, she was always very generous when it came to her kitchen, allowing any of us grandchildren to rifle through her cupboards, pull out her ample stash of muffin tins or bake-ware, and have a go at creating recipes. She was (and still is) my biggest inspiration in the kitchen. Not a trained chef, no top-notch culinary background, but boy could she cook! A few things I learned? Patience, accurate measuring, and always, always, select the best ingredients. Butter and good chocolate could always be found in her larder. An excellent selection of spices and herbs were lined up and sealed tightly in their glass bottles just waiting to become a pinch of this or a pinch of that. You could always count on finding buttermilk and sour cream and freshly squeezed lemon juice in her fridge.
When it came to ingredients for a recipe that we kids were determined to try or if art materials were needed to draw, sculpt or paint something, we had full access to her shelves and cupboards for supplies. Thank you, Grandma, for your grace and willingness to encourage all of us to ‘make things’. I think all of your grandchildren have a knack for creating, thanks to you! I’m still using many of her recipes. Those large index cards all hand-written and often smudged with some of the choice ingredients. I love all the side notes she added, “add a pinch of lemon zest” or “include a dollop of sour cream” or “don’t over-beat the batter”. When I am creating something, for the table or in the studio, I always think of my grandmother.
I just made these little yummy muffins the other day. Not her tried and true bran muffins but a favorite from my Gram’s recipe book. So glad I remembered them! Chock full of raisins, just the right amount of chopped walnuts, and a strong coffee flavor. Delish! Give them a try, really you should! Do you have any recipes that have been passed down from a special cook in the family?